My Posts


How Much Do You Love Me? garners positive review from Kirkus!

Kirkus logo_16Oct14

Kirkus Reviews (or Kirkus Media) is a respected American book review magazine, founded in 1933 by Virginia Kirkus (1893–1980).  Click here to read their review of How Much Do You Love Me?

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This weekend’s Barnes and Noble book signing–what fun!

I had the opportunity for a two-day signing at the Almaden Expressway Barnes and Noble (San Jose) this past weekend. I usually feel apprehensive before signings, this time wondering how I and my new historical novel, How Much Do You Love Me? will be received. Before long, those cares melted away. It’s such fun to talk to everyone. From the hundreds of folks I interacted with, buyers of my books ranged from a precocious seven-year old boy, all the way up to seasoned readers who have many stories to tell. Occasionally customers ask to take a picture with me.

Below, I share two photographs from this weekend. In the first, John insisted that I inscribe his book with something like “To the next best-selling author.” His enthusiasm was obvious. The second photo came about as I was closing up shop, getting ready to go home for the night. I wasn’t expecting to sell any more books when a mother (Sonia) and two daughters came by. We started a conversation that lasted some 10-15 minutes. The daughters (Sierra and Sheryl) each bought a book (one How Much? and the other White Thaw) and then asked for a photo. How could I possibly turn down an opportunity to appear in a picture standing between two young, good-looking ladies?

I would be remiss in not thanking the staff of Barnes and Noble: Jonathan, Eric, and Jeremiah helped me at one time or another.  A special thanks goes to Camille who made the signing possible and made sure all ordered books arrived in time. Ramon deserves a special shout-out. His enthusiastic, complimentary announcements over the PA system had me turning my head more than once and saying to myself, “Who’s he talking about? Is he talking about me?”

John_Almaden Barnes and Noble_12Oct14

Sierra and Sheryl_Almaden Barnes and Noble_12Oct14

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Stories you can listen to, #5: Double Exposure

In my continuing series of short stories, Double Exposure is told from the point of view of a teenage girl in the early 1960s.

Double exposure teenager_12Sep14

 

If it weren’t for the title story of my book of short stories, The Errant Ricochet: Max Raeburn’s Legacy, this one, Double Exposure, would be my favorite. In her own words that she uses to introduce the story, my teenage protagonist says it best:

“As a child–and especially as a teenage girl–I was told I was too smart for my own good. During the summer of 1963, I proved them all wrong.”

To listen to or read this short story, click here.

P.S.  As you know, I use two electronic robots to read my stories, a male (Ryan) and a female (Heather).  To my own ear, Heather is the better reader, and I would recommend her.

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Weekend special! Get your 99 Cent ebook copy of How Much Do You Love Me?

This weekend only, Friday through Monday, 3-6 October, my publisher, Cedar Fort, in coordination with my publicist, is selling all e-book versions of my historical novel, How Much Do You Love Me? for only 99 cents.  Grab your copy while the price is low.  Click here to choose your favorite e-book store.      


The Japanese Internment of World War II, Part 6: One family’s journey to their internment camp

This blog is Part 6 of a series discussing the internment of Japanese in the United States during World War II. This sequence is meant as an accompaniment to my historical novel, How Much Do You Love Me? As discussed in Part 5, following President Roosevelt’s decision to sign Executive Order 9066, the die was… View Article


Penn State alumni dinner, College of Earth and Mineral Sciences

There is a good reason that the first and third of my thriller trilogy involve meteorology: that was what I studied at my alma mater, Pennsylvania State University. Last Friday, the 19th of September, Becky and I had the good fortune to attend an alumni dinner (College of Earth and Mineral Sciences) there. We had… View Article


The Japanese Internment of World War II, Part 5: Their world turned upside down

This blog is Part 5 of a series discussing the internment of Japanese in the United States during World War II. This sequence is meant as an accompaniment to my historical novel, How Much Do You Love Me? The bombing of Pearl Harbor by Japan in December of 1941 immediately clouded the future of all… View Article


Stories you can listen to, #4: Under Penalty of Prosecution

In my continuing series of short stories, this one is told from the point of view of an 8-year-old boy. I don’t know how you were as a kid, but I was always afraid of doing something wrong. Perhaps it was because I grew up influenced by a church that looked upon activities as diverse… View Article


The Japanese Internment of World War II, Part 4: Executive Order 9066

This post is part of a continuing series of blogs accompanying the release of my historical novel, How Much Do You Love Me?  Parts 1, 2, and 3 covered “Pre-Pearl Harbor,” “Pearl Harbor,” and “Anti-Japanese Frenzy,” respectively. As you recall, Pearl Harbor was bombed on December 7th, 1941.  Not long afterward, pubic sentiment, fueled mainly… View Article


The Japanese Internment Of World War II, Part 3: Anti-Japanese Frenzy

This series of blogs is being published to coincide with the release of my historical novel, How Much Do You Love Me? Parts 1 and 2 covered the pre-war situation for Japanese Americans and the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Part 3 covers what happened following Pearl Harbor. Pearl Harbor immediately ratcheted  up ill feelings toward the… View Article