My Posts


Stories you can listen to, #9: Lemonade or Iced Tea

Lemonade_6Feb15

 

In my continuing series of short stories, Lemonade or Iced Tea, although relatively short at 900 words, is told from three points of view: mother (Emily), daughter (Janet), and fiancé (Timothy). Will Timothy end up marrying Janet? You decide.

Click here to either listen to or read the story.

Feel free to share this blog. Please e-mail (tag@peoplepc.com) me if you have questions.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

*


White Thaw: The Helheim Conspiracy receives acclaim from Kirkus Reviews

 

Kirkus logo_16Oct14

 

White Thaw: The Helheim Conspiracy is the third in my trilogy of thrillers. Here is a copy of the Kirkus review:

KIRKUS REVIEW

In Tag’s (Category 5, 2005, etc.) thriller, a scientist learns that Nazis are planning a return to power with an attack of worldwide proportions—and that her family in Colombia may be behind it all.

Linda Kipling’s father, on his deathbed, relays shocking news: Linda’s family fled Germany at the end of World War II. Her father was unaware of the true atrocities of the Nazi regime, but her uncle Friedrich certainly wasn’t, based on letters he’d written to Kipling’s mother. Friedrich has apparently been plotting a Nazi “comeback” for some years. Kipling makes cousins Dieter and Axel Müller nervous when she flies to Cartagena, Colombia, to see what they might know about Friedrich’s purported plan; clearly, she’s onto something big. She and Victor Silverstein, her boss at the Naval Research Laboratory in California, connect the Nazi scheme to missing NRL researchers in Greenland and a couple of NRL scientists murdered in the U.S. Friedrich’s letters hint at the plan’s catastrophic goal, and global warming may not be as natural an occurrence as people believe. It may seem that the author is setting up a preachy environmental message on climate change, but he instead dishes out a solid thriller rife with action and suspense. Parts are reminiscent of a murder mystery, as Capt. Jane Stigler of the Federal Center for Data Examination, whose former well-respected boss was one of the people killed, investigates the murders with technical director Andrew Peters. Other scenes smolder with tension, like Kipling’s trying to escape the Müllers’ compound after realizing that her cousins are no longer interested in letting her live. Anticipation is at full steam for most of the story: Dieter and Axel, who are, at least for readers, indisputably the villains, have a Plan B should their Greenland operation be discovered, and it’s even more ominous than what’s already taking place. A few of Kipling’s actions are questionable: She’s smart enough to avoid going to the NRL or home when she’s being trailed by an assassin, but she rather foolishly keeps her cellphone on—a beginner’s mistake in this day and age. Still, Kipling’s a worthy protagonist, and she and Silverstein, featured in Tag’s prior novels, may earn new fans.

Global warming is a mere plot device for this substantial thriller.

WhiteThaw Cover

 

Kirkus Reviews (or Kirkus Media) is a respected American book review magazine, founded in 1933 by Virginia Kirkus (1893–1980). Click here to go directly to the Kirkus review of White Thaw: The Helheim Conspiracy.

Feel free to share this blog. Please e-mail (tag@peoplepc.com) me if you have questions.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

*


Stories you can listen to, #8: Jimmy Boy

Barometer_13Jan15

In my continuing series of short stories, “Jimmy Boy” is told from the point of view of Delores Weaver, an elderly woman riding out Hurricane Iniki in Kauai, Hawaii, in September of 1992. It isn’t long before Delores and her husband, who has Alzheimer’s, have to move from their apartment to a storm shelter. It’s obvious to Delores that the storm has upset her husband. To comfort him, she retells a story that never fails to bring a smile to his face.

Click here to listen to or read the story.

Feel free to share this blog. Please e-mail (tag@peoplepc.com) me if you have questions.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

*


The Japanese Internment of World War II, Part 8: Internment in Hawaii

This blog is Part 8 of a series discussing the internment of Japanese in the United States during World War II. This sequence is meant as an accompaniment to my historical novel, How Much Do You Love Me? To cover an aside, Part 8 takes a slight detour to the flow established in the previous… View Article


Stories can be really short! Stories you can listen to, #7: The Long Walk Home

I wrote this story specifically, and was lucky for it to be accepted, for publication in Storybytes, an online magazine.  Stories published in this magazine have word counts of a power of 2. My story is 128 words long, which is 2 to the power of 7. Click here to listen to or read the story…. View Article


New review just posted for Category 5

As most of you know, until I switched genres to historical fiction with How Much Do You Love Me? I wrote thrillers, a trilogy: Category 5, Prophecy, and White Thaw: The Helheim Conspiracy.  The first in this series, Category 5, which focused on weather modification and hurricanes, has a brand new review. I am posting it here because this reviewer,… View Article


The Japanese Internment of World War II, Part 7: Assembly Centers

Image courtesy of www.pinedalememorial.org This blog is Part 7 of a series discussing the internment of Japanese in the United States during World War II. This sequence is meant as an accompaniment to my historical novel, How Much Do You Love Me? Part 6, “One Family’s Journey to their Internment Camp,” discussed one family’s journey… View Article


Stories you can listen to, #6: Jailbait

In my continuing series of short stories, Jailbait is told from the point of view of a young woman who finds herself in serious trouble after accepting a ride while hitchhiking.     As youngsters and teenagers, we’ve all made stupid decisions that have landed us in trouble. Some of us have even made them… View Article


Readers! Listen up! It’s not OVER until it’s OVER!

My historical novel, How Much Do You Love Me? came out on August 12th, and I’ve been reading reviews since. Several of them gave me the disquieting feeling that the reader hadn’t finished the book. Finished? “Why wouldn’t anyone finish the book? Is your book that bad?” you ask. How Much? is a mystery and… View Article


U.S. reaction to Pearl Harbor and Ebola: Similarities?

More than one reviewer of my historical novel, How Much Do You Love Me?, has remarked about how sad the internment of the Japanese Americans during World War II was. Of the photographs I have seen, none encapsulates that sadness more than the one above (courtesy of the Library of Congress), showing a young Japanese-American… View Article